Subscribe to our RSS feeds

Top Stories

  • Fighter jet involved in accident at Dayton International Airport


    Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(DAYTON, Ohio) -- An F-16 Thunderbird has been involved in an accident at the Dayton International Airport, an airport spokesperson told ABC News.

    There were no fatalities in the accident, the spokesperson said.

    The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds said in a statement that the plane was conducting a familiarization flight and that there was a "mishap" upon landing at 12:20 p.m. local time.

    Further details on the incident were not immediately available.

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

  • Dennis Rodman: 'People don't see ... the good side' of North Korea


    ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Former professional basketball player Dennis Rodman spoke out in an exclusive interview with ABC News about his recent trip to North Korea, suggesting that he is partly responsible for the reclusive nation's release of American college student Otto Warmbier, who died last Monday, just days after being medically evacuated from a North Korean prison.

    "I was just so happy to see the kid released," Rodman told Good Morning America co-anchor Michael Strahan of when he first learned of Warmbier's release. "Later that day, that's when we found out he was ill, no one knew that. We jumped up and down ... Some good things came of this trip."

    Warmbier, who was released on the same day that Rodman arrived in North Korea for a brief visit, was sent back to the U.S. in a state of unresponsive wakefulness, according to doctors at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.

    The University of Virginia student was detained by North Korea for nearly 17 months following his January 2016 arrest in Pyongyang, for allegedly trying to steal a propaganda poster while he was visiting the country on a sightseeing tour.

    Despite Rodman's belief that he had something to do with Warmbier's release, Warmbier's father said in a statement to ABC News that "Dennis Rodman had nothing to do with Otto returning to the United States."

    Chris Volo, Rodman's agent who accompanied the athlete on his trip to North Korea, told ABC News that before they went, "I asked on behalf of Dennis for his release three times."

    "I know being there had something to do with it," Volo said of Warmbier's release. "Because when I was organizing the trip ... and I meet with the delegates here, you know, I addressed ... Otto Warmbier. And I said to them, 'we...would need his...you know, a release, some type of good faith, if we're ever going to do some type of future sports relations ... They said they understood."

    Rodman said he wished to "give all the prayer and love" to the Warmbier's family, adding "I didn't know that he was sick."

    Volo added that they have contacted the family and are hoping to meet them, "but we were told that, you know, it just couldn't happen."

    The two-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year said he didn't meet with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, during his most recent visit.

    "The previous times we did," he added. "I think the fact that, you know, my trips going up to North Korea is more like trying ... to get to communicate sports-wise. It ain't about trying to release people."

    "It's not trying to do ... political stuff. It's almost just trying to reach out for sports and see if I can bring sports to North Korea," Rodman said.

    Rodman also discussed how the country has changed over the course of his visits, saying "we've seen a lot of changes," including "the fact that it is so modernized now."

    "When you go over there, and you hear the radio, and ... people are talking," Rodman said. "They're so happy now, because it's more like ... it's civilized again."

    Rodman, who calls North Korean leader Kim Jong-un a friend, said, "people don't see ... the good side about that country. It's like going, like, to Asia. It's like going to like Istanbul, Turkey, or any place like that. It's pretty much just like that. You're know, you going to see some poverty. You're going to see some people that's not doing too well."

    "I think people don't see him as ... a friendly guy," Rodman added of the country's dictator, adding "if you actually talk to him" you would see a different side of him.

    "We sing karaoke," Rodman added of his relationship with Jong-un. "It's all fun. Ride horses, everything."

    "It's the politics that's the bad thing. If we can try to figure something out, just open the door," Rodman suggested, saying that he believes "if Donald Trump had a chance," he would fly to North Korea "and try to make peace."

    Rodman, who identifies as a Trump supporter, also called on the president to join him in creating peace with North Korea.

    "I'll ask him right now. Donald, come talk to me. Let's try to work this out. Because you know what? I get nothing out of this. The only thing I get is out of pride for my country, America. I love America," Rodman said. "But I want these two sides to get together and try to figure something out. Some dialogue. That's it."

    Rodman also revealed that the North Korean leader gave him a message to pass on to former President Obama on one of his previous visits, and he thinks the next time he visits, the leader may give him a message for President Trump.

    "I think the next time we go, I think it's going to be in August. I think the fact that when ... I sit there and talk to him ... he'll throw comments out there," Rodman said of Kim Jong-un. "You know, he'll say, 'I want three things, Dennis, from you, if you can do this for us.'"

    Rodman said that his message for Obama was to ask him to "move his ships."

    "He said, 'There's just one thing I, I, would love for ... Obama to do,'" Rodman said of his conversation with Kim Jong-u. "He said, 'I would love him if he can move his ships...away a little bit.' That's the one thing he asked me. He said, 'If he can do that, I think we can have some new positive.'"

    Rodman said that he is not going to North Korea for attention, saying, "I don't need to be on TV."

    "What am I getting out of this? I'm going over there out of my kindness of my heart just to try to help. Just to open the door ... a little bit so we can have [a] talk," Rodman said.

    "I'm spending hundreds of dollars just to go over there to try to just open the door a little bit," Rodman said.

    Rodman said despite the widespread criticism and backlash that he has faced for his trips to North Korea, "I think it's worth it."

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

  • Rep. Steve Scalise out of ICU, listed in 'fair condition'


    Allison Shelley/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., is out of the intensive care unit, a source familiar with his recovery said, nine days after the House majority whip and three others were shot at a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia.

    Scalise has not been released from the MedStar Washington Hospital Center and is still listed in "fair condition."

    Hospital officials said earlier this week that "Scalise continues to make good progress" and "is beginning an extended period of healing and rehabilitation."

    Dr. Jack Sava, the director of trauma at the MedStar Washington Hospital Center, said last week that Scalise had "sustained a single rifle wound that entered in the area of the left hip. It traveled directly across toward the other hip in what we call a trans pelvic gunshot wound. The round fragmented and did substantial damage to bones, internal organs and blood vessels.

    "I understand he was awake on scene but by the time he was transported by helicopter to the MedStar trauma center, he was in shock," Sava said. "When he arrived, he was in critical condition with an imminent risk of death." His condition later improved.

    The alleged shooter, identified by police as James Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville, Illinois, was killed in a shootout with police after shooting Scalise, a Capitol Police officer and two others at a practice for the annual charity congressional baseball game. Hodgkinson's wife emotionally told reporters, "I can’t believe he did this," saying there were no signs.

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

  • Texas police officer sues Ford, claims his squad SUV made him sick


    iStock/Thinkstock(AUSTIN, Texas) -- A Texas police officer has filed a lawsuit against Ford Motor Company, claiming that his squad car literally made him sick.

    Austin Police Sgt. Zachary LaHood was issued a 2011 Ford Explorer, a sport utility vehicle that's popular with police departments around the country. In March, while he was behind the wheel of the SUV, LaHood passed out and had a minor accident.

    His attorney, Brian Chase, blames an exhaust leak that's been found in that model.

    "I want the public to be outraged over our police driving these cars to protect us, sometimes at very high rates of speed, are at risk of passing out and not only killing themselves, but crashing into us," Chase said.

    LaHood alleges that Ford Motor Co. knew about a potential exhaust leak in 2011 to 2015 Explorer police models and issued a recall. The automaker says it's aware of an odor in some Explorers, but adds that its own investigation has determined that it isn't a health or safety risk.

    The sergeant says he has lingering neurological damage and wants over a million dollars from Ford and the dealership which, his lawsuit alleges, failed to fix the problem.

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

  • Scoreboard roundup -- 6/22/17


    iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the latest scores and winners:

    AMERICAN LEAGUE
    Chicago White Sox 9, Minnesota 0
    Texas 11, Toronto 4
    Houston 12, Oakland 9
    L.A. Angels 10, N.Y. Yankees 5
    Cleveland 6, Baltimore 3
    Seattle 9, Detroit 6

    NATIONAL LEAGUE
    Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 1
    Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2
    Arizona 10, Colorado 3
    Chicago Cubs 11, Miami 1
    Atlanta 12, San Francisco 11
    L.A. Dodgers 9, N.Y. Mets 6

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

  • Johnny Depp says "assassination" comment about President Trump was a "bad joke"


    ABC/Randy Holmes

    (LOS ANGELES) -- Hours after actor Johnny Depp made it sound like he'd be interested in killing President Trump, he's saying he's sorry.

    The Pirates of the Caribbean star seemingly referenced Abraham Lincoln's assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, while Depp introduced his new film The Libertine at England's Glastonbury Festival Thursday. Depp asked the crowd, "When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?"

    He then added, "Maybe it's time." 

    Following a huge outcry, and a condemnation by the White House, Depp now tells People, "I apologize for the bad joke I attempted last night in poor taste about President Trump. It did not come out as intended...I intended no malice. I was only trying to amuse, not to harm anyone.”

    In a statement, the White House said, "President Trump has condemned violence in all forms and it's sad that others like Johnny Depp have not followed his lead."

    The statement added that the White House hoped that, "some of Mr. Depp’s colleagues will speak out against this type of rhetoric as strongly as they would if his comments were directed to a Democratic elected official."

    The actor is just the latest celebrity to level violent words against the president. 

    Back in January, Madonna told a crowd she, "thought a lot about blowing up the White House." She later said she was taken out of context.

    Weeks ago, comedienne Kathy Griffin apologized for a photo shoot in which she held a bloodied dummy head made to look like President Trump's.

    The Central Park's Shakespeare in the Park retelling of Julius Caesar currently features the title character, actor Gregg Henry, specifically dressed like Trump, getting stabbed to death nightly.

    Depp's "assassination" message comes weeks after a disgruntled former Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer opened fire on a group of Republican legislators, critically wounding Rep. Steve Scalise.

     

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

     

  • Fifth Republican senator comes out in opposition to health care bill


    iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Senate Republican leaders unveiled what they called a "discussion draft" of their long-awaited health care bill, a part of the party's ongoing efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

    Five Republican senators have already come out in opposition to the Senate bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, jeopardizing its passage.

    Critics on both sides of the aisle said the bill, which was drafted behind closed doors by a small group of Senate leaders and committee staffers, has been shrouded in secrecy.

    Trump told reporters Thursday that there will be "a little negotiation, but it's going to be very good."

    Republicans 'not ready' to support the bill

    GOP Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky released a joint statement saying, "Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor."

    They added, "There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current health care system, but it does not appear this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs."

    In a separate statement, Paul said he'll oppose the bill "in its current form, but I remain open to negotiations."

    "The current bill does not repeal Obamacare. It does not keep our promises to the American people," he said.

    On Friday, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., joined the group, saying at a press conference that "this bill is not the answer, it's simply not the answer."

    "In this form, I will not support it," said Heller.

    Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, told reporters Thursday she has "not yet had the opportunity to read the text of the bill, and the details really matter."

    "I see some positive features of this bill that are improvements over the House, and I see some negative features based on my first analysis," she said. "I don't like the provision that eliminates federal funding for Planned Parenthood. It makes no sense to single out Planned Parenthood from all the Medicaid providers. There's already a ban against using federal funds for abortions, so there's absolutely no need for that."

    A vote from Collins, who has been willing to break from her party, would be key to ensuring the bill's passage.

    Senate Republicans can afford to lose only two of their members to pass the bill, assuming Democrats remain united in their opposition.

    Republicans acknowledge tough road ahead for bill

    As members left a meeting about the bill, many said they were encouraged by their first impressions of the text but were hesitant to say if it would clear the 50 vote threshold for passage.

    "There's a lot to digest. It's very complicated," Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., said as he left the gathering.

    Some Republicans said they liked how the Senate bill calculates the value of tax credits to help individuals pay for insurance.

    While the House bill linked the tax credits to age only, the Senate bill considers age, income and geographical area.

    "A person making about $12,000 a year will have more access and a lower cost of health insurance. And that's a really good thing," said Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.

    But Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., a member of Senate leadership, acknowledged that the draft would not pass in its current form.

    "Right now the challenge is, how do we get to 50?" he said.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated that he wants to get a vote before the July 4 legislative recess.

    Democrats and ACA supporters unhappy

    The bill's release was met with significant opposition from Democrats and other supporters of the Affordable Care Act.

    Under current law, all insurance plans have to include, at a minimum, specified essential health benefits, including ambulance service, hospitalization, maternity care and prescription drug coverage. Under the Senate bill, states would be allowed to apply for waivers from those regulations and essentially scrap them to write their own rules.

    As the bill was being unveiled, a large demonstration formed outside McConnell's office, with people in wheelchairs staging a die-in and protesters chanting that no changes be made to Medicaid. Demonstrators were physically removed by Capitol Police officers.

    Congressional Democrats were also forceful in their condemnation.

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer slammed the Senate bill as "every bit as bad" as the American Health Care Act passed in the House.

    "The president said the Senate bill needed heart. The way this bill cuts health care is heartless," Schumer said Thursday. "The president said the house bill was mean. The Senate bill may be meaner."

    He continued, "The Senate Republican health care bill is a wolf in sheep's clothing, only this wolf has even sharper teeth than the House bill."

    During her weekly press conference, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said it's important to stop the legislation, which she called "a tax bill disguised as a health care bill."

    Top medical organizations call on the Senate to reject the bill


    So far, the Senate health care bill has not gotten any backing from top health or medical organizations. The American Public Health Association, the American Psychiatric Association and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology released statements urging the Senate to reject the Better Care Reconciliation Act and expressed concerns over the closed-door negotiation process.

    "The Senate proposal represents a significant move in the wrong direction, resulting in fewer people having access to insurance, fewer patient protections and less coverage for essential behavioral health care," American Psychiatric Association's CEO and medical director, Saul Levin, said in a statement.

    The American Public Health Association attacked the bill's closed-door shaping as "legislative malpractice."

    The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology said, "Despite numerous efforts to collaborate and provide input throughout this process, women's health expertise was rejected. It is reckless for legislation that will have such an immense impact on Americans' lives and the economy to proceed without opportunity for public hearings or any external commentary."

    Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Area Weather

KOKOMO
Kokomo Weather
LAFAYETTE
Lafayette Weather
FRANKFORT
Frankfort Weather
LOGANSPORT
Logansport Weather

Now On the Air

On the air now.
lewis01
pump-patrol

friday-frenzy-header

Watch here for more Friday Frenzy Deals!

MORE GREAT BARGAINS

LISTEN LIVE
PET-OF-THE-DAY
ENCOMPASS
farmers-bank